Tag Archives: portraits

Book Review: Colored Pencil Painting Portraits: Master a Revolutionary Method for Rendering Depth and Imitating Life, by Alyona Nickelsen

Colored Pencil Painting PortraitsI’ve always thought colored pencils were underrated, but I found them quite frustrating in my past attempts using them for realism. If I’d have had Alyona Nickelsen’s Colored Pencil Painting Portraits: Master a Revolutionary Method for Rendering Depth and Imitating Life twenty years ago, I probably wouldn’t have given up on them so easily. Every obstacle I encountered has been demonstrably removed through this book. Approaching them like oil paints, Nickelsen demonstrates ways colored pencils can be even more versatile and easier to use than any of us ever imagined. This incredibly informative, technical, scientific, and beautiful work will prove to be indispensable for any artist using (or wanting to use) colored pencils as a serious artistic medium. God bless Alyona and all the artists who follow her in elevating colored pencils in the world of art.

 

*I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

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Book Review: Portrait Revolution: Inspiration from Around the World for Creating Art in Multiple Mediums and Styles, by Julia L. Kay

Portrait RevolutionPortrait Revolution: Inspiration from Around the World for Creating Art in Multiple Mediums and Styles by Julia L. Kay is a beautiful and inspiring journey into the what, why, and how of portrait making through the mind’s eye of artists around the world. Wonderfully organized according to media, style, and theme, most of the book presents portrait samples of the same person as rendered by different artists. Every portrait includes subject, artist, medium, and size (when applicable), but many include notes by the artist—a brief explanation of the image or insight into method. The book concludes with featured artists and a helpful collage of quotes by included artists on portrait making.

While many may stumble upon this up at a bookstore, flip through its pages to see what he or she does and does not like, and then put it down—let’s be honest, not all of the included portraits are going to be aesthetically pleasing to all—Kay has included text for a reason. Read it! While I did not enjoy a great many of the portraits, I did enjoy hearing from the artists themselves, which caused me to think more deeply about how I might interpret a portrait in different ways. I learned.

Kudos to Kay and all contributors. I’ve been inspired to do more portraits and, perhaps, even look into finding interest from other artists in my area who may want to start up our own “portrait party.”

 

*I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.